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    Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Shalini Randeria, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Mariella Franzoni, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Margareta von Oswald, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Carlos Quijon, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Roger Nelson, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Violet Nantume, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Iaroslav Volovod, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Syafiatudina, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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    Ying Tan, Transcuratorial Academy (TCA), Haus der Kulturen der Welt, 2017

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TCA Berlin

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About
Keynote
Participants

The TRANScuratorial Academy (TCA) is an initiative of KfW Stiftung with the aim of advancing international knowledge transfer, networking and the development of the transcultural and transdisciplinary curatorial discourse. It is directed by Beatrice von Bismarck and Benjamin Meyer-Krahmer. The academy is structured in three chapters (Berlin, Mumbai, Phnom Penh), each of which is centered on a keyword in a five-day programme.

‘Entangled Histories’ is the keyword of the TCA Berlin in cooperation with Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The public programme includes a conference with presentations by the eight participating curators and a keynote lecture by Shalini Randeria, Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute Geneva and Rector of the Institute of Human Sciences (IWM), Vienna.
Furthermore, discussions with experts and protagonists of the local art scene are an integral part of the TCA. A series of workshops will take place with Shalini Randeria as well as the curators Clémentine Deliss and Anselm Franke. Within a two-day excursion the participants will visit various museums and art spaces in Berlin.

TRANScuratorial Academy
Entangled Histories
Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin, 15-19 May 2017

Public Programme

15 May 2017
Conference room K1

9:30
Welcome

10:00
Iaroslav Volovod, Moscow
Curatorship: Ravelled Discourses vs. Disentangled Histories

10:45
Mariella Franzoni, Barcelona/Cape Town
Researching on Art Curation and the Curating of Artistic Research: An Entanglement of Histories and Value Regimes

Break

11:45
Violet Nantume, Kampala
Spaces of Being

12:30
Syafiatudina, Yogyakarta
In Keeping up with the Irregular Rhythms

Lunch

14:30
Carlos Quijon, Jr., Manila
Tropic Inclinations and Conceptual Labors

15:15
Roger Nelson, Phnom Penh
Between the Curatorial and the Art Historical (in Southeast Asia): Contemporary Art in History, History in Contemporary Art

Break

16:15
Margareta von Oswald, Berlin
Of Ghosts in Museums: Curatorial Challenges in Ethnological Collections

17:00
Ying Tan, Manchester
Funes the Memorious

16 May 2017
Vortragssaal

19:30
Shalini Randeria
Of Entanglements Past and Present

Of Entanglements Past and Present
Keynote by Shalini Randeria

Shalini Randeria is the Rector of the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in Vienna and Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva. Since March 2017 she is also the Director of the Hirschman Centre on Democracy at the IHEID. Furthermore, she is a Visiting Professor at the Social Science Research Centre Berlin (WZB) and the FU, Berlin. She has been a Member of the Senate of the German Research Council (DFG), President of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) and a Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies, Berlin. Before joining the Graduate Institute in Geneva, Shalini Randeria was Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Zurich, as well as Professor and Founding Chair of the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology of the Central European University Bu-dapest. She has held Visiting Professorships at Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (as Max Weber Professor for Sociology), at the University of Vienna (Peter Ustinov Professorship) and at EHESS, Par-is. She has served on the Advisory Board of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, New York and on the Edito-rial Board of Annual Review of Anthropology. Currently, she is a member of the Editorial Board of the American Ethnologist (since 2015) and serves on the Board of Trustees of the CEU, the Academic Ad-visory Board of the Wien Museum as well as the Advisory Board of the Higher Education Support Pro-gram of the Open Society Foundations. She has published widely on the anthropology of globalization, law, the state and social movements. Her empirical research on India addresses issues of post-coloniality and multiple modernities.

15 Mai, 2017
7.30pm

Haus der Kulturen der Welt
John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
10557 Berlin

Free Admission

 

 

Iaroslav Volovod, Moscow
Curatorship: Ravelled Discourses vs. Disentangled Histories

As a result of its genealogy, where theory and practice are congenitally entwined, сuratorship has not yet been fully established as a discourse, or, in Foucauldian terms, has not had a ‘founder of discursivity,’ and, for that reason, it is initially trans-discursive in its confrontation of any rigid theoretical dogmas. Hence, curatorship oftentimes opts for more the ‘practical’ format of a ‘living knowledge’ for self-theorization, such as a collection of interviews or semi-autobiographical narratives furnished with critical reflections, whilst the latest curatorial vagaries are transmitted, as a rule, in various self-organizing institutions and venues, such as creative spaces, art clusters, artist’s and design studios, and lofts. In the meantime, yielding to a certain inner paradox, curatorship aspires to percolate its discourse into the places of ‘legitimate’ knowledge production, such as museums and universities, sporadically transforming these traditional structures from within. In these endeavors to crystallize its own theory and gain a foothold as a discourse, curatorship ordinarily encounters resistance in the form of critical commentary. While the sharpest challenges of the curatorial continue to lie in its immanent multi-disciplinarity, it may also be considered advantageous, for a true unbounded curation, or curating with love, as Pascal Gielen puts it, is capable of discovering such things and such relations that as yet have no language and has no history of their own. In this presentation, I will focus on my personal curatorial practice and the ways in which it has been instrumental in building vocabularies around such under-represented dimensions of Russian cultural history as feminism and coloniality of power.

Iaroslav Volovod is Assistant Curator at the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow. He holds a BA in Asian and African Studies from St. Petersburg State University and an MA in Curatorial Studies from Bard College, NY. He has had internships and study visits in Germany, India, and the UK. His personal and professional identities have sensitized him to non-dominant experience and institutional practices that address communities at the cusp of change. Currently Iaroslav is investigating South Asian artists in Britain, in addition to working with international and local art practitioners.

Mariella Franzoni, Barcelona/Cape Town
Researching on Art Curation and the Curating of Artistic Research: An Entanglement of Histories and Value Regimes

Considering the mostly Western-centered geography of knowledge production and education in the realm of curatorial studies and theory, it is important not to turn definitions, conditions and institutions of the curatorial elaborated in Western academic and professional contexts, into universal and exportable reference models or units of measurement. As a researcher investigating on curatorial practice from a transdisciplinary perspective and developing most of my research in South Africa with a focus on case studies from the commercial gallery sector, my approach is informed by these reflections, and takes up the challenge of offering new understandings of this field of practice that are specific of a post-apartheid and post-colonial context, but that necessarily give a fundamental contribution for a global and multi-sited theory of the curatorial. In order to exemplify this approach, Ne Travaillez Jamais (2015-16) and History Begins with a Garden (2017), two exhibition projects I recently curated in commercial art spaces in Johannesburg and Barcelona respectively, will help me to address some of the questions that inform my doctoral research, concerning the interplays of different regimes of value in art curating, a practice embodying the ambiguity between the economy of gift and the speculative culture of the semiocapitalist, postcolonial era.

Mariella Franzoni is a PhD researcher (Universities Pomepu Fabra and Western Cape) and independent curator based in Barcelona and Cape Town. With an education background in the fields of cultural anthropology, art theory and cultural management, her research focuses on the interplays between politics of curating and the regimes of value in contemporary art, and looks at these dynamics in the emergence of the curatorial in post-apartheid South Africa. Mariella’s curatorial activity is informed by collaborative and transdisciplinary approaches.

Violet Nantume, Kampala
Spaces of Being

My curatorial practice explores cultural blasphemies and controversies. I am interested in ideas that disrupt existing paradigms about on a wide range of subjects, meant to encourage alternative ways of perception. Eroticism and Intimacy: Faces, Places and Paths (2016) was a group exhibition, which highlighted the place of sexual rights and personal liberties as well as the need to reclaim the eroticisms of the black body and decolonize desire. We live in societies that have preconceived ideas of what sex should be. Taking off from East Africa, men and women, whose sexual expression deviates from the cultural expectations of certain people, have been restricted, violated and their rights to sexual expression have been overlooked. Body Pedagogy, a workshop staged during the exhibition, was in response to the theme by the Zimbabwean critic George Shire, centering on the question of how to live together relationally, how to confront our self-division, how to experience the unbearable undoing of the logic that binds ‘us’ to the world, how to share a thought or an object when the pressure of its handling by another risks breaking the object. Shire is convinced that contemporary African sexual identities are constructed out of the peculiar, particular, multiplicitous effects and perceptions of tradition, modernity, colonization and globalization that are more often than not in confrontation with each other, sexuality is today at once the most personal and private, the most public and the most political of issues that engages us both intellectually and practically in everyday life. Africa’s heritage of colonialism has determined its antagonistic relationship with the West as much as its continued desire to be measured by and against Western paradigms, amounting to a crudely defined national difference. Cast a Light on Prejudice (2015) was an exhibition of the photographer Papa Shabani. On one hand, the exhibition explores and disseminates the subject of Albinism in East Africa, and on the other, it focuses on the royalty lives of Nubian Women living in Kibera slum in Kenya. Shabani captures the story of the indefatigable spirit of the Nubians, a story of defiance and hope in the face of insurmountable odds. Nubian women are queens with an elegant sense of dress and fashion, and their impeccable culinary skills are still Kenya’s most invisible and underrepresented communities, even then, where their presence is unrecognized and their citizenry is labelled as ‘other’, they stand tall and refuse to be put down.

Violet Nantume is a curator at UNDER GROUND Contemporary Art Space in Kampala/Uganda. Prior to that, she was the director of Kampala Art Auction. Nantume curated the multipart exhibition Eroticism and Intimacy in Kampala and at the 2016 FNB Joburg Art Fair. She is working on a publication with Nubuke Foundation, Ghana, and INDULGENCE, a group show in Kampala. She attended Asiko Art School and Global Crit Clinic in Accra/Ghana, 2013. In 2017 Violet was awarded with a KAAD scholarship for the MA course ‘African Verbal and Visual Arts’ at the University of Bayreuth/Germany.

Syafiatudina, Yogyakarta
In Keeping up with the Irregular Rhythms

How to maintain the collective work, live, and being in the context of relations with differences, precarity and unevenness? I would like to reflect on this question specifically depart from the current ongoing work of my collective, KUNCI, which is entitled School of Improper Education (www.sekolah.kunci.or.id). The school aims to study on the meanings of studying and the ways to study these meanings. The first session is being held from 2016 to 2017.

Syafiatudina has interests on curatorial work as frictional interplay between theory and practice. Her practice revolves around the role of art as part of critical knowledge production which shape political subjects. Syafiatudina is working as a writer, curator and member of KUNCI Cultural Studies Center (www.kunci.or.id) in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Founded in 1999, KUNCI has primarily focused on critical knowledge production and sharing via media publications, cross-disciplinary encounters, research actions and artistic interventions.

Carlos Quijon, Jr., Manila
Tropic Inclinations and Conceptual Labors

I am interested in the conceptual labors that attend the curatorial. I am interested in how the curatorial unsettles conceptual habits and habitations, unfixes conceptual loci and locutions, via submitting them to the labors of concept work, an interrogation of their present constitutions intimating mobility of thought. In my practice as editor and aspiring curator, these conceptual labors are shaped by a tropic inclination. I use trope in relation to what the late postcolonial critic Srinivas Aravamudan describes as a word’s ‘swerv[ing] from self-adequation to its surplus and while doing so, [its] mov[ing] from the ‘proper and natural’ to another meaning ‘with some advantage.’’ Within the ambit of practice, this tropic inclination is animated by an ‘attitudinal shift,’ which Aravamudan, writing on the paradoxes of colonial discourse, elaborates as the seizure of the ‘tropological opportunity with the hope of some advantage, seeking a renewed critical purchase on texts and their historical contexts.’ Within this trajectory, I talk about transit, an online journal that I edit and which focuses on the idea of ‘the new’—a key lexicon in avant-gardist discourse and also in authoritarian rule, such as in Marcos’ New Society or Suharto’s Orde Baru—and how it can be understood to frame the contemporary, especially with the idea’s permutations as the neo- in neo-colonialism. I talk about this in relation to the traction of conceptual grammars that shape the transcultural as a tropic, as troped. I focus on trans- as tropological inflection, as bearing and burden of curatorial work, specifically in relation to the in/commensurability of contexts and logics of practice that the transcultural/transcuratorial imagines.

Carlos Quijon, Jr. coordinates exhibitions and writes essays and poetry. His work has been most recently published in the Kritika Kultura Special Literary Section on the Contemporary Philippine Essay. He was a fellow in the Independent Curators International’s Curatorial Intensive in Manila (2016) and the inaugural edition of Para Site’s Workshops for Emerging Art Professionals in Hong Kong (2015). He is founding editor of transit, an online intermedia journal.

Roger Nelson, Phnom Penh
Between the Curatorial and the Art Historical (in Southeast Asia): Contemporary Art in History, History in Contemporary Art

As a double-blind peer reviewed scholarly journal, Southeast of Now: Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia is not really a curatorial project. Indeed, when we were invited last year to contribute to an edited volume titled SouthEastAsia: Spaces of the Curatorial, our editorial collective was unable to agree what to do. Yet, all nine members of the collective—spread across eight locations, most within the region—have organized exhibitions, and most of us continue to work curatorially, alongside art historical research. This presentation will consider the somewhat uncertain relationship between the curatorial and the art historical (and also between the contemporary and the modern) in my recent practice, discussing two ongoing projects. First is an exhibition, People, Money, Ghosts (Movement as Metaphor), which opened at Bangkok’s Jim Thompson Art Center in early March, and runs until late June. The exhibition features recent works by contemporary artists, but is accompanied by a series of lectures on unabashedly historical topics, including the emergence of modern painting in Cambodia in the early 20th century, and archival materials on pioneering Sri Lankan American art historian and curator, Ananda Coomaraswamy. The second project I’ll discuss is a collaborative essay, which will collate research by 12 art historians on terminologies of ‘modern’ and ‘contemporary’ ‘art’ in 11 languages of greater Southeast Asia. This project is being prepared for volume 2 of Southeast of Now, which will take up the theme of ‘movement.’ In what ways might contemporary curatorial discourse inform this scholarly inquiry into art historical linguistics for Southeast of Now? And in what ways might the art historical methods and modern case studies as presented in the Jim Thompson lectures inform the exhibition People, Money, Ghosts (Movement as Metaphor), in its conception or its reception? I have no sure answers to these questions.

Roger Nelson is an art historian and curator based in Phnom Penh, and co-founding co-editor of Southeast of Now: Directions in Contemporary and Modern Art in Asia, a journal published by National University of Singapore Press. He recently submitted a PhD at the University of Melbourne, on modernity and contemporaneity in ‘Cambodian arts.’ Roger writes for journals, magazines, books and catalogues internationally. He has curated projects in Australia, Cambodia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.

Margareta von Oswald, Berlin
Of Ghosts in Museums: Curatorial Challenges in Ethnological Collections

In 1998, the French anthropologist Jean Jamin famously asked: ‘Should we burn ethnographic museums?’ Ethnological museums have had to deal with a vigorous critique, one which questions the legitimacy of their very existence. The collections’ entangled histories of material and symbolic appropriation, shaped by the colonial encounter, make them particularly challenging from a curatorial point of view. In my talk, I will address, first, my current PhD project. It focuses on curatorial strategies in ethnological museums, based on fieldwork in Tervuren’s Royal Museum for Central Africa (Belgium), to open in 2018, and Berlin’s Ethnological Museum. The latter will integrate the much contested Humboldt Forum on Berlin’s museum island in 2019. In my thesis, I am suggesting to look at the museum as a haunted space. I am introducing the figure of the ghost to address processes of negotiations around the museum’s legacies differently: Ghosts are figures of return, insisting on the persistence of the past in the present. They blur multiple boundaries, for example of past, present and future; of materiality and immateriality; of subject and object; of reality and imagination, fact and fiction. Second, I will focus on my own curatorial practice. I will take the exhibition Object Biographies, co-curated with Verena Rodatus (Humboldt Lab Dahlem, Ethnologisches Museum Berlin, 2015) as an example to show our attempt to problematize some of the museum’s contested legacies. We rotated the gaze to the institution itself, directing it to the institution’s histories, networks and practices. We chose the narrative tool of the ‘object biography’ to address the often little-known and sometimes problematic stories of how the objects were collected, transported, stored, categorized, catalogued, and exhibited. I will conclude by discussing how the negotiation around colonial and anthropological legacies might transform the ethnological museum into a ‘space of working through’ (Wayne Modest), a ‘space of repair’ (Kader Attia).

Margareta von Oswald is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Anthropological Research on Museums and Heritage (HU Berlin) and the EHESS Paris. She works on the contemporary challenges of museum collections acquired on the African continent, mainly during colonial times. She is co-organizer of the seminar series Rewriting the Colonial Past: Contemporary Challenges of Museum Collections (EHESS, Paris). In 2015, Margareta co-curated Object Biographies at the Humboldt Lab Dahlem, Berlin.

Ying Tan, Manchester
Funes the Memorious

Our personal histories do not exist as a continuous entity governed by a single logic or narrative; on the contrary, they are rooted within the connections and ways in which they intersect. Curator Anthony Huberman has pointed to the etymological link of the term curation with ‘care’ and the importance of curating ‘in the key of I CARE’. Within my work, I have always had a care and concern for negotiating sites of cultural specificity in my practice. My work is influenced by own histories, but also my practice aims to examine the generation of creative output through forming chains of dialogue amongst a wide range of artistic mediums. Coming from an immigrant family escaping turmoil in China post-1989, I am acutely cognisant of the complexities of contemporary art ecologies with respect to the surrounding socio-political environments. As I often find myself both outside of my immediate communities and completely immersed within it – it is in this critical distance and constant negotiation amidst its questions which has informed the development of my professional practice. Jorge Luis Borges conceived of the character called Ireneo Funes in a short story called Funes the Memorious (1942), a man who is described as afflicted with the condition where, if he saw a dog from the side, it would look unrecognisable from a different angle one minute later. Although Funes is unable to escape his predicament of seeing nothing but unrepeatable differences, there is an aspect of this character that exists as a metaphor for someone reflecting on the notion of ‘entangled histories’. Like Funes who surprised himself each time he looked in a mirror, I think it is equally important to recognise the multiplicity of intersections which reside within one's practice in order to be able to invite conflicting perspectives and contrasting readings.

Ying Tan is curator at the Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art (CFCCA) in Manchester. She has curated numerous exhibitions in CFCCA, in addition to many other off-site projects in London and internationally. This includes the co-commission of Haze & Fog with Cao Fei (2013), as well as UK premiers of What Happened in the Year of the Dragon (2014) with Sun Xun and Xu Bing's Book from the Ground (2003-present). She is a visiting lecturer for Christie's Education (UK) and a contributor to KALEIDOSCOPE Asia Magazine. She was also on the curatorial faculty for Liverpool Biennial 2016.